On Jillian Michaels

You think I would not have anything to say about Jillian Michaels? After she slammed Lizzo’s size? You don’t know me.

Dear Jillian Michaels:

Am I less of a person because of my weight?

Because that’s what I hear you say about Lizzo.

You think Lizzo is worth hating because of her size.

As well as me, I assume.

Sincerely,

Cambria Jenkins.

Madonna/Whore: T.I. Edition

Content Warning: Talk of Sexual Politics 

By now, you’ve heard rapper T.I. requires virginity checks of his daughter, even after she’s 18. Apparently, she has some magical hymen which can be checked.  

It’s okay, he thinks. He just does not want his daughter to be a whore. 

Because whores are ruined forever. 

Because he suffers from Madonna/Whore syndrome. 

Madonna/Whore Syndrome is a predominantly male (yes, women can suffer from this too) train of thought that a woman must be a virginal Madonna (originally given to the Virgin Mary, mother of Jesus) to be worthy of love. Any sexual contact at all, even a kiss on the cheek in some circles, makes you a whore. You are either a Madonna or a whore. 

And a whore is ruined forever. 

There is no grace for the whore. 

There is no forgiveness for the whore. 

Does he understand that, in the Bible, the very book he probably uses to justify his behavior; MEN must adhere to the same exacting standard he is subjecting his daughter to? The Bible is no respecter of gender or sex.

Funny how sexual sin only seems to apply to women.

Question: Why do I get the feeling T.I.’s daughter will marry the first guy who gets close enough to her and never speak to her father again? 

Why Autistic Adults Hate Blue Buckets

It started here in Kentucky early. Once the Halloween merchandise came out, there they were, in an aisle display: blue buckets. I was not impressed. I’m a member of the pillowcase club, first of all. Second, they are apparently associated with identifying autistic children and adolescents (who still trick or treat). Why do we need a small blue bucket on Halloween anyway?

Number one: a pillowcase is better, in that it holds more candy. I will say it before, and say it again. You have to work hard to beat something that can hold a lot of candy and be used beyond Halloween (on your pillows). It was only this October that I finally saw something that may be able to beat that practicality: a reusable grocery bag. Maybe it can beat the pillowcase simply due to handles. I don’t know.

Number two: Blue pumpkins can easily be associated with Autism Speaks. (I will say the name to reduce its fear and influence.) Now, this may be hard to comprehend, but we autistic people do NOT wish to be just like you. Autism is what we know. Besides, Autism Speaks wants to get rid of autistic people by “curing.” Most of us see curing autism in the same vein most people see something like, I don’t know, Invasion of the Body Snatchers. We see a lot of prejudice against us drummed up by that organization, in the name of so-called charity. Sure, they change the language, but they also promote anti-vaccine culture.

Number three: Do we really need to single out people on Halloween? Think about it: Most children and many adults are dressed as something out of their ordinary. Do we need to make the children feel alienated on all days of the year? To an autistic person, the blue puzzle piece and the blue bucket has a purpose similar to the yellow stars the Nazis made Jews wear in their day. Also, if a child is scared to go somewhere for any reason, there is no need to force them to go to the door of some house. You would not do that to a neurotypical child, would you?

The bottom line is: We know we are different. Stop using blue things to throw it in our faces.

Gudetama and Eeyore

I’ve recently gained a new special interest. This little egg with crippling depression is the cutest thing I have seen in a long time. It’s a little yellow yolk who does not want to leave its white, or shell for that matter. (It’s probably too peopley out there.) Now, where have I seen a lovable character with symptoms of depression before? 

“Thanks for noticing me.” 

Oh, yeah. Now I see it! It’s a cute little Eeyore! That wonderful little donkey plush from Winnie the Pooh adventures. He kind of balances out all the craziness, and sees beauty in calm, serene and quiet times. The lovable donkey who has similar traits to little Gudetama! I bet they would be great friends, if they met.  

******* 

The thing about Gudetama and Eeyore is this: they do not need to be a little happy thing to be cute. They’re even cute with their lack of energy. They are accepted as they are. And they are cute as they are.  

A Bit on Ali Stroker

Well, Ali Stroker won a Tony Award for her work in an Oklahoma! Revival. I am glad she won! That girl can sing and act! I am glad you can finally have limitations and have a representative.  

“Representation matters,” is a line Craig Melvin tends to use about the whole thing. He’s right. There is even video proving this online. In the video, a little boy, himself using a wheelchair, said, “That’s me!” He even got to meet her on the Today Show. I am so glad this is happening.  

There are a few small minuses to address. One of them is the line, “She’s an inspiration!” Basically, this says, “She is strong for living with such a tragedy.” You know what it says to me, a disabled woman? It says you underestimate human persistence.  That’s not cool.  Also, there is this nagging question: did she win because of her talent and work, or did she win because she was in a wheelchair? Hopefully, she won because of her talent and work. I would like to think that, especially since this question tends to nag me every single time someone less privileged in this society wins. (Did America Ferrera win her Emmy because she was talented, or because she was Ugly Betty? Did Ashley Graham win the Sports Illustrated cover because she was beautiful, or because it was lip service to body positivity? Did John Legend EGOT because of his work, or because of his race?) See how it works? I hope it’s because of their talents and work, in all cases I mentioned.

Anyway, I am so excited! Ali Stroker won!

Is This Burnout?

I don’t know what’s happening to me lately. I’ve been having writer’s block much more often, and for longer periods of time. I mean, how many times can you write about the same topics – measles outbreaks blamed on your existence, autism hate and discrimination, etc. – over and over? I mean, I wish I could have access to Game of Thrones and complain about the ending episodes like everybody else on the internet, but I can’t afford HBO right now. My cable bill is up to $200 without it already. Besides, do you want me to sound like a neurotypical describing autism and getting it wrong, like they usually do? Anyway, I did watch the series finale of The Big Bang Theory, even with the pseudo-autistic Sheldon. It was alright. Somebody finally explained to the pseudo-autistic what a jerk he has been to them. You can be autistic and still be kind, you know. Maybe I can complain about pop culture a bit, but even that seems like a strain to me.  

Perhaps it is a lack of inspiration? 

Perhaps this is burnout.  

Ugh, I feel like Gudetama right now.  

No, My Autism is NOT a Superpower or a Tragedy, It’s Neutral

Controversial, no? That I can see my condition as neutral? I guess I’m really different from other people. Let me explore the ways both values can be right and wrong, and show you how I reject both of them.  

Autism as a Superpower: This is not a viewpoint shared among many autistic people, though many non-autistic people think we do. Why people think we hold this is a mystery to us. Are we that arrogant to you? We certainly are not to ourselves. There are many things many of us cannot do without support, such as go grocery shopping. Perhaps the reason they think we hold this so-called belief is – maybe those dumb T-shirts saying “Autism is my Superpower.” I do not know of an autistic adult that actually owns a T-shirt with that message. The difficulties given to us by autism make us humble. Basically, it is arrogant to think that you are better than another person, simply because you are different from them. This pattern of thinking goes down a slippery slope to prejudice and scapegoating.  

Autism as a Tragedy: This is the other extreme viewpoint we try to ignore. This is ableism in a nutshell. Basically, a disabled person is tragic, and the only way they can make the world a better place is to remove themselves from it. In movies such as “Me Before You,” suicide for the disabled person is seen as good! How disgusting is that? It infuriates me. Just because we operate on a different level is not a reason to advocate for suicide! We are denying autistic people the basic right to live! Another slippery slope appears: If we kill off all the people who are different from us, whoever wins that war would be the last person on earth. I’m not going there. One person can only do so much. 

Why do people assign value to neutral events? Is this another symptom of the Power and Control addiction?  

I have decided to reject both viewpoints, because they are gravely erroneous. They both lead to the same conclusion: prejudice, scapegoating, and eventually, death to the autistic. I want to live. I want to be able to access the rights that only White Men!!! can currently: the rights to Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness. I want my life to matter.